• When the Smoke Fills My Eyes I could feel that there was something different about today when I woke up this morning. First of all, my eyes were stinging. The smoke from the morning cook fires was hanging low in the morning air. Every morning mom would start the cooking ...
  • The Indigenous Coast to Coast Film Festival by Asata Radcliffe When is the last time you’ve seen a horror film starring Native American actors? Or a dystopian film set 71 years into the future filmed entirely on a reservation? How about a documentary that features Native Americans living in Los Angeles ...
  • Picture in Hand You never know when inspiration is going to sneak up and hit you. It could be a walk in the cold, while working or maybe even at a construction site. This is a collection of pictures I have taken when I felt inspired by the beauty of ...
  • On Wampanoag Clothing in Native Fashion Now by Elizabeth James-Perry I would have to conclude, after this playful photograph was snapped at the November 2015 exhibit opening, that my brother and I are indeed, Re-visitors. My Aquinnah women’s outfit in Native Fashion Now, Peabody Essex Museum exemplifies the way trade ...
  • Machias Bay Petroglyphs I wonder . . . I wonder Will things ever change? As time slowly rips away I wonder . . .I wonder As the water tears away chunks of stone slowly changing. . .rapidly changing I wonder . . .I wonder As I look upon this stone ...
  • Mi’kmaq Creation Story for Faith Liljegren upon her Confirmation Of course you are familiar with the Genesis creation stories, and know others exist in different cultures around our world. We Mi’kmaq have our version, too—deep and involved. It goes something like this: All life seen and unseen comes from me, ...
  • Condolence* for Frank Speck, April 2014 “Here,” the Curator says, “identify these.” Throwing the wampum on the table as though it is an inanimate thing. The answer is close at hand but the words catch in my throat the lights dim other voices whisper. “These damn Indians can’t tell one ...
  • Weaver Weaver by weaver, Up and under each standard Up and under As my hand moves in rhythm A figure starts to emerge A figure of the ancestors Silently whispering Reminding us they are still here Through tradition Through language They are still here To the naked eye a basket ...
  • Cultural Lives Matter by Paula Peters As Native Americans we endure regular acts of cultural degradation from children dressed up for Halloween in outfits that are a reflection of our traditional regalia to team mascots and sports fans wearing feathers and face paint mocking ancient spiritual rites and tradition. The ...
  • Maurice Kenny was born in Watertown, New York on August 16, 1929 to parents of mixed ethnic heritage; his father, Anthony Andrew Kenny, was of both Mohawk and Irish ancestry, while his mother Doris Herrick Kenny, was both Seneca and English. He was raised in both Watertown and Bayonne, New ...
  • To The Young Couple  In The Booth Across From Me   You looked into each other’s eyes while above you five televisions blared five different games and around you Friday Night Happy Hour cursed and howled and waitresses in short kilts and kneesocks danced past you blouses molded to their ...
  • Crossroads When standing at a crossroads it's not the end it's the beginning of a continuation of four directions Be grateful you're at the center make your choice it's all good you won't step off into an abyss You will step into your place stepping into place the place you've ...

Issue no. 4

The Fourth Issue
  • Letter from the Editor

    This past year we have lost two respected and well-loved elder writers, Maurice Kenny, who passed in spring 2016, and Doris Seale, who died early this spring. Many of us have been touched by their generosity, their examples, their poetry, and their commitment to Native American literature and communities. We ...
  • Maurice Kenny: In Memoriam

    Maurice Kenny was born in Watertown, New York on August 16, 1929 to parents of mixed ethnic heritage; his father, Anthony Andrew Kenny, was of both Mohawk and Irish ancestry, while his mother Doris Herrick Kenny, was both Seneca and English. He was raised in both Watertown and Bayonne, New ...