• Natalie Dana has written a children’s song which has been translated into Passamaquoddy.  We are happy to present both. Margaret Apt sings "Lintuwakon Aputamkon" here, and the CD is called "All My Children, Songs and Lullabies from Wabanaki Singers." This project was funded by Wabanaki Maine Families. The poem has changed ...
  • Crossroads When standing at a crossroads it's not the end it's the beginning of a continuation of four directions Be grateful you're at the center make your choice it's all good you won't step off into an abyss You will step into your place stepping into place the place you've ...
  • Derek C. Maus "Mastery" If ever word there was that needed rescue From overfoul connotation, it might well be this: Master. From Tom Waits’s Renfield shouting it slavishly – “May-aaaaaasss-tuh!” – at Gary Oldman’s draconic Dracula, To Simon Legree’s “bad cop” juxtaposed against Augustine St. Clare’s ostensibly “good cop” It’s ...
  • When the Smoke Fills My Eyes I could feel that there was something different about today when I woke up this morning. First of all, my eyes were stinging. The smoke from the morning cook fires was hanging low in the morning air. Every morning mom would start the cooking ...
  • League -Falls Church, Virginia Friday! Finally five o’clock! I grab my coat, purse and duffel bag, quickly change from corporate to jeans, run down the stairs to my car and head west to Bowl America where friends, seated at tables along ten lanes reserved for our American Indian League, are ...
  • Machias Bay Petroglyphs I wonder . . . I wonder Will things ever change? As time slowly rips away I wonder . . .I wonder As the water tears away chunks of stone slowly changing. . .rapidly changing I wonder . . .I wonder As I look upon this stone ...
  • Lily Paul Her name is Aurora Little Bear. When she pushed herself out of her mother’s womb, old Lily Paul caught her. Lily’s strong brown hands were calloused from work, veins popping with excitement. She washed her and wrapped her in a flannel blanket while she sang Aurora her Indian ...
  • Kataahdin     Read Suzanne Rancourt's article in Combat Stress about trauma and her healing through expressive arts and Native culture and ceremony at www.stress.org   Suzanne S. Rancourt's book, Billboard in the Clouds, Curbstone Press, was the 2001 recipient of the Native Writers First Book Award. She is an Abenaki ...
  • Spring Thaw I arrive at mossy banks beside Birch sentries with battle torn limbs from winters fury We stand in silent honor of the river passing by grateful for the spring thaw on the Kennebec Highway of my ancestors liquid life carrying pieces of trees gliding in succession to places ...
  • Alice Azure It was September of 2012 in Milwaukee. A group of us were packed into a van on our way back to our hotel from the opening ceremonies of Returning the Gift. Maurice Kenny was sitting right behind me in the van, driven by a young man intent on, ...
  • Weaver Weaver by weaver, Up and under each standard Up and under As my hand moves in rhythm A figure starts to emerge A figure of the ancestors Silently whispering Reminding us they are still here Through tradition Through language They are still here To the naked eye a basket ...
  • Circle the Powwow Drum The grass dancers circle the powwow drum The fancydancers circle the powwow drum The jingle dress dancers circle the powwow drum The traditional dancers circle the powwow drum The braves circle the powwow drum The veterans circle the powwow drum The chief circles the powwow drum ...

Issue no. 4

The Fourth Issue
  • Letter from the Editor

    This past year we have lost two respected and well-loved elder writers, Maurice Kenny, who passed in spring 2016, and Doris Seale, who died early this spring. Many of us have been touched by their generosity, their examples, their poetry, and their commitment to Native American literature and communities. We ...
  • Maurice Kenny: In Memoriam

    Maurice Kenny was born in Watertown, New York on August 16, 1929 to parents of mixed ethnic heritage; his father, Anthony Andrew Kenny, was of both Mohawk and Irish ancestry, while his mother Doris Herrick Kenny, was both Seneca and English. He was raised in both Watertown and Bayonne, New ...