• League -Falls Church, Virginia Friday! Finally five o’clock! I grab my coat, purse and duffel bag, quickly change from corporate to jeans, run down the stairs to my car and head west to Bowl America where friends, seated at tables along ten lanes reserved for our American Indian League, are ...
  • Jeff's Song He brought to us richness A certain opulence left in his wake This brown man From the eastern shores the people of the purple shell his Narragansett he gave permission for indulgence fine food, wine, art jazz the company of Lena Horne, Satchmo, Billie Holiday a time of ...
  • Sequence of Life I held on to your soul While you sold Your last celestial breath To the skies and all her stars. We sat before the rolling seas Filled with much trepidation, Never quite sure how to surrender Our words and bodies to all their beauty. I can’t remember ...
  • Wikôtamuwôk Wuci Ki tà Kihtahan (A Celebration of Land and Sea): Modern Indigenous Cuisine in New England Preface As a Mohegan tribal member, I grew up attending festivals and events that centered around indigenous food, such as the Green Corn Festival, Succotash Time, and summer powwows throughout New England. Many ...
  • Natalie Dana has written a children’s song which has been translated into Passamaquoddy.  We are happy to present both. Margaret Apt sings "Lintuwakon Aputamkon" here, and the CD is called "All My Children, Songs and Lullabies from Wabanaki Singers." This project was funded by Wabanaki Maine Families. The poem has changed ...
  • Kuhtôqatun/Our Story: On Being a Native Writer Our story breathes within the rocks, trees and hills of New England. It is a living story, told in the colors of blood and sky, earth and sun. It runs through woodlands; swims through rivers, flies to the clouds, touches the boundless starry ...
  • Crossroads When standing at a crossroads it's not the end it's the beginning of a continuation of four directions Be grateful you're at the center make your choice it's all good you won't step off into an abyss You will step into your place stepping into place the place you've ...
  • The Indigenous Coast to Coast Film Festival by Asata Radcliffe When is the last time you’ve seen a horror film starring Native American actors? Or a dystopian film set 71 years into the future filmed entirely on a reservation? How about a documentary that features Native Americans living in Los Angeles ...
  • Writer’s Statement   Some quotes like some faces are seared into one’s consciousness. One such quote was from a graduate level faculty member who stated, “You can’t be a writer if you don’t read Ezra Pound.” Another faculty member stated, “Native writing isn’t writing and is not to be pursued.” 1. ...
  • Derek C. Maus "Mastery" If ever word there was that needed rescue From overfoul connotation, it might well be this: Master. From Tom Waits’s Renfield shouting it slavishly – “May-aaaaaasss-tuh!” – at Gary Oldman’s draconic Dracula, To Simon Legree’s “bad cop” juxtaposed against Augustine St. Clare’s ostensibly “good cop” It’s ...
  • Mi’kmaq Creation Story for Faith Liljegren upon her Confirmation Of course you are familiar with the Genesis creation stories, and know others exist in different cultures around our world. We Mi’kmaq have our version, too—deep and involved. It goes something like this: All life seen and unseen comes from me, ...
  • I received the letter below, with some of Doris Seale’s poems, from Judy Dow, and reprint that material here with her permission.  Judy also supplied the following biography of Doris, as well as the photographs --Cheryl Savageau, editor. ******** Doris Marion Seale was born in 1936 in Brattleboro, VT, and ...

Issue no. 4

The Fourth Issue
  • Letter from the Editor

    This past year we have lost two respected and well-loved elder writers, Maurice Kenny, who passed in spring 2016, and Doris Seale, who died early this spring. Many of us have been touched by their generosity, their examples, their poetry, and their commitment to Native American literature and communities. We ...
  • Maurice Kenny: In Memoriam

    Maurice Kenny was born in Watertown, New York on August 16, 1929 to parents of mixed ethnic heritage; his father, Anthony Andrew Kenny, was of both Mohawk and Irish ancestry, while his mother Doris Herrick Kenny, was both Seneca and English. He was raised in both Watertown and Bayonne, New ...