• The Indigenous Coast to Coast Film Festival by Asata Radcliffe When is the last time you’ve seen a horror film starring Native American actors? Or a dystopian film set 71 years into the future filmed entirely on a reservation? How about a documentary that features Native Americans living in Los Angeles ...
  • Statement on Poetry  by Carol Bachofner I’ve been “writing things down” for a very long time. In fact I don’t recall when I didn’t. Because of the fact that I write things down, words are important to me. When I write poems, I am acutely aware that words are the ...
  • Jeff's Song He brought to us richness A certain opulence left in his wake This brown man From the eastern shores the people of the purple shell his Narragansett he gave permission for indulgence fine food, wine, art jazz the company of Lena Horne, Satchmo, Billie Holiday a time of ...
  • So Far Away Along the passages of the times come and gone, There are various thoughts that come on strong, Where I see you as being so far away, Images that may go astray, While I am here and you are there, I reach out with concerns and care, As ...
  • League -Falls Church, Virginia Friday! Finally five o’clock! I grab my coat, purse and duffel bag, quickly change from corporate to jeans, run down the stairs to my car and head west to Bowl America where friends, seated at tables along ten lanes reserved for our American Indian League, are ...
  • To The Young Couple  In The Booth Across From Me   You looked into each other’s eyes while above you five televisions blared five different games and around you Friday Night Happy Hour cursed and howled and waitresses in short kilts and kneesocks danced past you blouses molded to their ...
  • Lily Paul Her name is Aurora Little Bear. When she pushed herself out of her mother’s womb, old Lily Paul caught her. Lily’s strong brown hands were calloused from work, veins popping with excitement. She washed her and wrapped her in a flannel blanket while she sang Aurora her Indian ...
  • Crossroads When standing at a crossroads it's not the end it's the beginning of a continuation of four directions Be grateful you're at the center make your choice it's all good you won't step off into an abyss You will step into your place stepping into place the place you've ...
  • Pushing the Boundaries: An Interview with Two New England Native Artists Virginia McLaurin is a PhD student in the Anthropology Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in Native Studies and Film. Her Eastern Cherokee ancestry led to her academic focus on both dominant filmic and televisual representations of ...
  • The Wasp and Spider People in Low Income Tribal Housing i. Circles of Mud, Dust, and Spit the wasps were making their home inside the crease in the siding of my apartment they wove and wove circles of mud and dust and spit their numbers increased to thirty or fourty ...
  • Natalie Dana has written a children’s song which has been translated into Passamaquoddy.  We are happy to present both. Margaret Apt sings "Lintuwakon Aputamkon" here, and the CD is called "All My Children, Songs and Lullabies from Wabanaki Singers." This project was funded by Wabanaki Maine Families. The poem has changed ...
  • Machias Bay Petroglyphs I wonder . . . I wonder Will things ever change? As time slowly rips away I wonder . . .I wonder As the water tears away chunks of stone slowly changing. . .rapidly changing I wonder . . .I wonder As I look upon this stone ...

Issue no. 4

The Fourth Issue
  • Letter from the Editor

    This past year we have lost two respected and well-loved elder writers, Maurice Kenny, who passed in spring 2016, and Doris Seale, who died early this spring. Many of us have been touched by their generosity, their examples, their poetry, and their commitment to Native American literature and communities. We ...
  • Maurice Kenny: In Memoriam

    Maurice Kenny was born in Watertown, New York on August 16, 1929 to parents of mixed ethnic heritage; his father, Anthony Andrew Kenny, was of both Mohawk and Irish ancestry, while his mother Doris Herrick Kenny, was both Seneca and English. He was raised in both Watertown and Bayonne, New ...